Solar eclipse 2017 diagram

Subscriber Account active since. On August 21, around lunchtime in most cities in the United States, a total solar eclipse will pass through the country, moving from Oregon to South Carolina. If you're in the moon's shadow today, the sky will go dark for just under three minutes. Ana Pelisson. A total solar eclipse is considered the most spectacular — globally, only about a third of all solar eclipses are total.

During a total solar eclipse, three key conditions happen at the same time: The moon is in the "new moon" phase; the moon crosses the plane of the Earth's orbit; and the moon is at its closest point to Earth in its orbit. When those conditions align, the Earth, sun, and moon line up.

Then, if you're in the path of totality, the moon appears to mask the sun. The moon orbits Earth every But the moon is not in line with Earth's orbit relative to the sun, which is why we don't have a solar eclipse every month. The moon's orbit is tilted about five degrees, which is large enough to keep its shadow off the Earth and the Earth's shadow off the moon most of the time. There are two points — called nodes — where the moon's orbit crosses the Earth's plane.

On the diagram above, the moon is lined up on a node. The moon aligns with the nodes and the sun about twice per year, which is how we get eclipses. You get a solar eclipse when the moon is between the Earth and sun. You get a lunar eclipse when the moon is on the other side of the Earth, farthest from the sun.

A solar eclipse is when the moon's shadow falls somewhere on the Earth's surface. The shadow's placement determines what the solar eclipse looks like on Earth. Jeff Thornton carries his daughter, Sammie, 4, to view the total solar eclipse in St. Paul, Ore. Getty Images The total solar eclipse has 10 distinct phaseseach with different amounts of the sun visible from the ground level. During this eclipse, totality will last a maximum of 2 minutes and 43 seconds.

After that, the moon will continue to travel across the sky to form another crescent. The eclipse ends when the moon ceases to cover the sun. If you plan to watch the eclipse, make sure you are wearing certified eclipse glasses. If you stare directly into the sun for an extended period of time, you risk damaging your eyes.

The only safe time to look at the eclipse without glasses is during the minute or two of totality. Business Insider logo The words "Business Insider". Close icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. It indicates a way to close an interaction, or dismiss a notification. Account icon An icon in the shape of a person's head and shoulders.

It often indicates a user profile. A leading-edge research firm focused on digital transformation. World globe An icon of the world globe, indicating different international options. Leanna Garfield and Anaele Pelisson.On Monday, August 21,all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina.

Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk.

Map of Total Solar Eclipse on 21 August 2017

NASA created this website to provide a guide to this amazing event. Here you will find activities, events, broadcasts, and resources from NASA and our partners across the nation. Share your video with us in this Flickr group or on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Apps Stay informed on the go with eclipse apps. Enthusiastic for Science Beyond the Eclipse? Planning Your Eclipse Party Many eclipse enthusiasts host parties in local community centers, museums, observatories, parks or open fields.

Even your own backyard is a good place to throw a party.

solar eclipse 2017 diagram

It is always a good idea to choose place that has access to shade and facilities. You may also want to check weather-related Web sites for forecasts of your area. Eclipse Misconceptions Humans have watched eclipses since before the dawn of written history, and during this long span of time our scientific understanding of the physical world has grown enormously.

As a consequence, many of the older ideas we had about the causes and effects of total solar eclipses have been replaced by detailed physical explanations. FAQ As we admire the rarity of a total solar eclipse, many questions come to mind that not only occur to us now, but have puzzled eclipse watchers for thousands of years. Downloadables Please feel free to download maps, posters, fact sheet, safety bulletin and other materials for use in your communities and events. We appreciate it if you credit NASA.A Space Place Trivia Alert!

While we call it a solar eclipseastronomers call it an occultation. An occultation happens when an object blocks your view of another object. In this case, the moon blocks your view of the sun. That means during the day, the moon moves over the sun and it gets dark.

This total eclipse happens about every year and a half somewhere on Earth. In this picture, the moon is covering up the sun in the middle of the day. This total solar eclipse was visible from the northern tip of Australia on November 13, Image courtesy of Romeo Durscher.

But not everyone experiences every solar eclipse. Getting a chance to see a total solar eclipse is rare. You have to be on the sunny side of the planet when it happens. On average, the same spot on Earth only gets to see a solar eclipse for a few minutes about every years!

Never look directly at the sun, even for a second! It will damage your eyesight forever! To view a solar eclipse, use special solar viewing glasses.

Get them from a camera store or online. Sunlight bending through the atmosphere and absorbing other colors is also why sunsets are orange and red.

During a total lunar eclipse, the moon is shining from all the sunrises and sunsets occurring on Earth! The moon can be behind Earth but still get hit by light from the sun. This diagram is not to scale: the moon is much farther away from Earth than shown here.

Unlike solar eclipses, lots of people get to see each lunar eclipse. An easy way to remember the difference is in the name. The name tells you what gets darker when the eclipse happens. In a solar eclipsethe sun gets darker. In a lunar eclipsethe moon gets darker. Launchpad: Solar Eclipses. Lunar Eclipses and Solar Eclipses. The Short Answer:. Here on Earth, we can experience two kinds of eclipses: solar eclipses and lunar eclipses.

How far away is the moon? If you liked this, you may like: Bad space weather cancels pigeon races! What Causes the Seasons? What Is a Solar Eclipse? More Less.On August 21, around lunchtime in most cities in the United States, a total solar eclipse will pass through the country, moving from Oregon to South Carolina.

If you're in the moon's shadow today, the sky will go dark for just under three minutes. The diagram below shows what will happen:. Ana Pelisson. A total solar eclipse is considered the most spectacular — globally, only about a third of all solar eclipses are total. During a total solar eclipse, three key conditions happen at the same time: The moon is in the "new moon" phase; the moon crosses the plane of the Earth's orbit; and the moon is at its closest point to Earth in its orbit.

When those conditions align, the Earth, sun, and moon line up. Then, if you're in the path of totality, the moon appears to mask the sun. The moon orbits Earth every But the moon is not in line with Earth's orbit relative to the sun, which is why we don't have a solar eclipse every month. The moon's orbit is tilted about five degrees, which is large enough to keep its shadow off the Earth and the Earth's shadow off the moon most of the time.

There are two points — called nodes — where the moon's orbit crosses the Earth's plane. On the diagram above, the moon is lined up on a node. The moon aligns with the nodes and the sun about twice per year, which is how we get eclipses.

You get a solar eclipse when the moon is between the Earth and sun. You get a lunar eclipse when the moon is on the other side of the Earth, farthest from the sun. A solar eclipse is when the moon's shadow falls somewhere on the Earth's surface. The shadow's placement determines what the solar eclipse looks like on Earth. Jeff Thornton carries his daughter, Sammie, 4, to view the total solar eclipse in St. Paul, Ore.Eclipses, whether solar or lunar, occur because of the periodic alignments of the sun, Earth, and moon.

solar eclipse 2017 diagram

These three bodies, orbit in space in very predictable paths yes, the sun orbits too. It orbits the galaxy once every million years!

Ever since the days of Kepler and Newton, we have been able to predict the motion of planetary bodies with great precision.

solar eclipse 2017 diagram

So, why do eclipses happen? The Moon moves right to left in its orbit around the Earth. The shadow it casts hits the Earth during the August 21, total solar eclipse. Solar Eclipses Happen when the moon moves between Earth and the sun. Not much, you say? So, sometimes the moon misses too high and sometimes too low to cause a solar eclipse. The Moon orbits the Earth in the months prior to the August 21, total solar eclipse.

Viewed from above, the Moon's shadow appears to cross the Earth every month, but a side view reveals the five-degree tilt of the Moon's orbit. Its shadow only hits the Earth when the line of nodes, the fulcrum of its orbital tilt, is pointed toward the Sun. This is true for both solar and lunar eclipses.

When the moon does eclipse the sun, it produces two types of shadows on Earth. The umbral shadow is the relatively small in diameter point on Earth where an observer would see a total eclipse. The penumbral shadow is the much larger area on Earth where an observer will see a partial eclipse. Here the sun is not completely covered by the moon. Depending on your location and on the specific geometry of the sun-Earth-moon system, you may experience one of four types of solar eclipses; total, partial, annular and hybrid.

Here, the observer is standing under the umbral shadow of the moon. This image shows the Aug.

Solar eclipse

Image Credit: The Exploratorium. The brighter stars and the planets come out. Animals change their behavior. Birds and squirrels nest. Cows return to the barn. Crickets chirp. There is a noticeable drop in both light level and air temperature. It is an eerie feeling. Totality can last for no more than about seven and a half minutes but is usually less than three minutes long. Here, the observer is standing in the penumbral shadow of the moon.

solar eclipse 2017 diagram

Image of an annular solar eclipse as seen from the Japanese Hinode Satellite. The eclipse begins as one type and ends as another.What causes a total solar eclipse? Learn about the basics of solar eclipses so that you can understand the spectacle of the Great American Eclipse on August 21, What causes a solar eclipse? The first fact to understand about solar eclipses is that they occur because of a remarkable cosmic coincidence: the Sun is just about the same apparent size in our sky as the Moon.

While the Sun is actually about times larger in diameter than the Moon, the Moon is also about times closer than the Sun. Therefore, the Sun and the Moon appear to be about the same size in our sky. This single fact explains why we see total solar eclipses - the Moon has an apparent size that just barely covers the Sun completely, yet is not too large that the Sun's atmosphere, its corona, is eclipsed as well.

We on Earth occupy a celestial sweet spot to witness this sight. If there are intelligent beings in other solar systems, the odds must be quite low that they would enjoy the same circumstance as we on Earth. So we are the beneficiaries of a wonderful cosmic coincidence. It was not always so. When the Moon first formed around our Earth over 4 billion years ago, it was much closer to the Earth and appeared much larger in our sky.

So total solar eclipses in the early epochs of our Earth did block the Sun but also most of the corona. Over the eons, the Moon is gradually receding from the Earth due to the friction from the tides.

At present, the distance from the Earth to the Moon increases by about an inch per year. What are the umbra and penumbra? When you read about eclipses, the terms umbra and penumbra are frequently mentioned. These are the two types of shadow cast by the Moon. The umbra is the inner shadow. If you stand inside the path of the umbra, the Sun will be completely blocked in eclipse. The penumbra is the outer shadow. If you are outside the path of the umbra but inside the broader eclipse area, you will only see the Sun partially eclipsed.

While the Moon and Sun have nearly the same apparent size in the sky, their apparent sizes do slightly vary because of two factors; the Moon is in a slightly elliptical orbit around the Earth and the Earth also revolves in a slightly elliptical orbit around the Sun. This variation results in the circumstance that sometimes the Moon's disk does not completely cover the Sun's disk during eclipse.

These are annular solar eclipses and a prominent example of this eclipse type occurred in the United States on May 20, The next annular solar eclipse will visit the United States on October 14, Annular solar eclipse on May 20, While an annular eclipse is a striking sight, it does not command the same overwhelming sense of wonder that a total solar eclipse does.

Daytime is dimmer but not twilight. Because some of the Sun's disk is still visible, it is much too bright for the Sun's corona to become visible. It is never safe to look directly at an annular solar eclipse, even at its maximum phase. If the Moon's shadow is not centered on the Earth, then another and common type of solar eclipse occurs, the partial solar eclipse.

During a partial solar eclipse, the umbra misses the Earth and from everywhere the eclipse is visible, you will only see part of the Sun eclipsed. Again, at no time during a partial solar eclipse should you look directly at the Sun without an approved solar filter or a pinhole projection.

If the orbit of the Moon were exactly within the same plane as the orbit of the Earth around the Sun, then total or annular solar eclipses would occur every lunar month. However, the orbit of the Moon has a tilt of about 5 degrees with respect to the Earth's orbit around the Sun. This diagram published in the book by Asa Smith, Smith's Illustrated Astronomyshows that because the nodes of the crosses of the orbit remains fixed throughout the year, there are two times during a year that are most favorable to a total solar eclipse.

Although published in the 19th century, these attractive diagrams still have the explanatory power to make eclipse concepts clear. On April 8,nature's grandest spectacle -- a total eclipse of the sun -- will cross over Mexico, the United States, and Canada.On Monday, August 21, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from the contiguous United States for the first time since Inside the mile-wide path of totality, the Moon will completely cover the Sun as the landscape is plunged into an eerie twilight, and the Sun's glorious corona is revealed for nearly 3 minutes.

Outside the narrow shadow track, a partial eclipse will be visible from all of North America.

Eclipse 101

Eclipse Bulletin: Total Solar Eclipse of August 21 is the ultimate guide to this highly anticipated event. Written by two of the leading experts on eclipses, the bulletin is a treasure trove of facts on every conceivable aspect of the eclipse. The exact details about the path of the Moon's shadow can be found in a series of tables containing geographic coordinates, times, altitudes, and physical dimensions. A set of high resolution maps plot the total eclipse path across the USA.

They show hundreds of cities and towns in the path, the location of major roads and highways, and the duration of totality with distance from the central line. Click here to see a sample map. Local circumstances tables for more than cities across the USA provide times of each phase of the eclipse along with the eclipse magnitude, duration and Sun's altitude. Click here to see a sample table of local circumstances.

An exhaustive climatological study identifies areas along the eclipse path where the highest probability of favorable weather may be found. A travelogue highlights key locations in the eclipse track from Oregon through South Carolina.

Finally, comprehensive information is presented about solar filters and how to safely observe and photograph the eclipse. For 15 years, Fred Espenak and Jay Anderson published more than dozen eclipse bulletins through NASA, each one covering a major upcoming solar eclipse. Prepared in cooperation with the International Astronomical Unionthe bulletins were internationally recognized as the most authoritative reference for each eclipse. The team has reunited to produce this new bulletin on the total eclipse through the USA.

It contains a comprehensive series of 37 high resolution, full color maps of the path of totality across the USA.

Total Solar Eclipse 2017 Path Through the United States

Click the following link to read a brief biography on the authors Fred Espenak and Jay Anderson. A great resource for the upcoming eclipse - Mike Reynolds Astronomy Magazine.

This is a list of errata in versions 1. They have all been corrected in the current version 1. This mobile strategy offers the highest probability of witnessing the spectacular total eclipse in clear skies.


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